April 23, 2018
Traditional french beef goulash
Recipe

Beer-Braised Beef Stew

by Berkeley Wellness  

Traditional french beef goulash

In general, stews use fatty cuts of meat that can hold up to long, slow cooking. Here we’ve used a lean cut, dredged it in flour, and browned it to seal in its juices.

Thai beef salad
Recipe

Thai-Style Beef and Noodle Salad

by Berkeley Wellness  

Thai beef salad

This beef and noodle salad is tossed in a dressing inspired by the interplay of sour, salty, and sweet flavors typical of Thai cuisine.

beef steaks served with broccoli
Recipe

Beef Braciole

by Berkeley Wellness  

beef steaks served with broccoli

Braciole is actually a specific meat cut (very thin slices), but it has come to mean a dish in which this cut is commonly used: stuffed meat rolls (also called involtini in Italian). In our version, the meat surrounds a mixture of broccoli and Parmesan.

Portion of traditional Beef stew
Recipe

West African-Style Beef Stew

by Berkeley Wellness  

Portion of traditional Beef stew

Peanut butter and sweet potatoes are the two ingredients that give this stew its African flavor—though in Africa the potatoes would more likely be yams. The peanut butter adds a wonderful richness of flavor for a modest 2.7 grams of fat per serving.

Simple Broiled Flank Steak
Recipe

Simple Broiled Flank Steak

by Berkeley Wellness  

Beef fillet

The simplest of seasonings is all you need for lean flank steak—in this case a sweet-tart glaze of currant jelly and lemon juice.

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

by Berkeley Wellness  

Woman sleeping in bed with white bedding

The National Sleep Foundation has released updated recommendations for sleep duration by age group—in most cases widening the range of hours considered appropriate. See how your sleep time measures up.

View as List 9 Facts About Saliva

  • drooling baby

    Less poetic than tears or blood, saliva is an essential bodily fluid that’s easy to take for granted. Here are some tidbits about spit. 

  • 1

    glass of water and ice

    Saliva is as much as 99 percent water, with a complex mix of proteins, minerals, vitamins, hormones, and other substances—along with traces of food, toothpaste, and whatever else you put in your mouth. 

  • 2

    woman showing tongue

    Hundreds of salivary glands in the mouth produce, on average, about a quart of liquid a day—enough to fill two medium-size bathtubs a year. But saliva production varies considerably from person to person, by time of day, and under different circumstances. Notably, you produce less saliva when you are sleeping or dehydrated and, typically, as you age. 

  • 3

    man with silly smile, showing tongue

    Mucins—protein molecules that might be compared to microscopic ball bearings—are the key lubricating components in saliva. They help you chew, speak, and swallow. They stick to the teeth and help shield them, to some extent, from bacteria and acids and thus from cavities. 

  • 4

    older woman covering mouth

    Saliva protects teeth and gums, lubricates the mouth, and helps regulate the acid balance of the mouth. It provides the environment in which tooth minerals can be replaced. That’s why chronic dry mouth can cause cavities and gum disease. 

  • 5

    woman biting into apple

    Saliva contains enzymes that start the digestive process by helping to break down starches and fats. It lubricates the food you are chewing and enables you to swallow it. 

  • 6

    thin-sliced oranges on black cutboard

    Food molecules must dissolve in saliva in order to be recognized by taste buds. 

  • 7

    man with toothache

    Saliva contains antibodies that fight germs, along with substances that promote skin cell growth and blood clotting. That’s an important reason why wounds in the mouth usually stop bleeding and heal faster than wounds elsewhere on the body. 

  • 8

    hand with cigarette

    When you are nervous or frightened, saliva production is reduced. Hot weather, inadequate fluid intake, strenuous exercise, many medications, and some medical conditions can result in decreased saliva production and potentially dry mouth. Smoking or breathing through your mouth dries up saliva.

  • 9

    breathalyzer

    Saliva can be analyzed to monitor alcohol intake, smoking, and drug use. It may also be useful in diagnosing disease. For instance, there are FDA-approved saliva tests to detect antibodies to HIV and the hepatitis C virus. Someday diagnostic saliva tests may be as common as blood tests. 

view from an aeroplane

Are You Fit to Fly?

by Berkeley Wellness  

view from an aeroplane

You probably know that you shouldn't fly if you have a contagious illness, but there are other situations—from a broken bone to a recent scuba dive—that may also merit delaying or even canceling a trip. Here's what you need to know to stay safe in the air.

sleepy cat
Wellness Tip

Don’t Ignore Cat Bites

by Berkeley Wellness  

sleepy looking cat

A cat bite may seem like no big deal. But cats' mouths are rife with dangerous bacteria, and even a minor-looking puncture can quickly progress to a serious infection requiring antibiotics or even hospitalization. Here's what you should know.

doctor holding bottle of cough syrup
Wellness Tip

Safer Treatments for Kids' Coughs

by Berkeley Wellness  

doctor holding bottle of cough syrup

A JAMA Pediatrics study found that a teaspoon of agave nectar or grape-flavored water improved cough-related symptoms in children younger than four compared with no treatment—and it's a lot safer than OTC cough medicine.

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