October 20, 2018
Actinic Keratosis: A Diet Link?

Actinic Keratosis: A Diet Link?

by Berkeley Wellness  

Research on the relationship between diet and actinic keratoses is very limited. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1994 found that a low-fat diet (20 percent calories from fat) reduced the risk of actinic keratoses in people with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer, which was attributed to a reduction in total dietary fat, not any specific type of fat.

In 2009, however, an Australian study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition linked oily fish (about an ounce a day, on average, from fish like salmon, tuna and sardines) to a 28 percent reduced risk, possibly due to their omega-3 fats, which have anti-inflammatory effects, and/or to other compounds in fish, such as vitamin D. Meanwhile, wine intake (a half-glass a day, on average) was linked to a 27 percent lower risk, possibly due to its polyphenols, which, as antioxidants, may help counteract the damaging effects of ultraviolet rays.